Monday, January 16, 2017

The Rhythm is Going to Get You!



Let’s face it, kids love to make noise and create things. Homemade rhythm instruments are all about cause and effect and kids can express feelings, moods, and emotions through music. These projects teach how sound is produced and ways that kids can change the properties of that sound. So, get out the box of recyclables and spend some quality time making music together.

WATER MUSIC:
5 clear glasses (all the same size)
Ruler
Water
Food Coloring
Numbered cards from 1-5
Metal spoon

Create a crystal concert using several glasses, water and food coloring. Fill the glasses with different levels of water to make different sounds. Follow the sequence of 1-inch in glass one, 2-inches in glass two and so on. The more water you put into the glass, the lower the tone. Tap out familiar songs with a spoon, or have your child compose his/her own tunes.
Play “Mary Had A Little Lamb” following this pattern:

3-2-1-2-3-3-3
2-2-2
3-5-5
3-2-1-2-3-3-3
3-2-2-3-2-1


PAPER PLATE TAMBOURINE:


Heavy-duty paper plate (paper, not plastic)
3-5 Jingle bells
Elastic thread or yarn
Paper hole punch
Markers, crayons, stickers
Glue

Decorate a paper plate with art materials. When finished, punch 3 to 5 holes around the rim with a hole punch. Tie one bell into each hole and add ribbons if you wish. Kids can hold the plate in their hands and shake it along with tapping the tambourine against their thighs and other parts of the body.

SNARE DRUM:  


Metal cookie/candy tin
Paper clips (about 20)
Cardboard circle (cut slightly larger than the diameter of the tin)
Packaging tape
Adhesive stickers, including musical notes
Drum sticks (unsharpened pencils or chopsticks)

Decorate the tin (lid discarded) and circle with colorful adhesive stickers (or paint a solid color with acrylic paints). Turn the tin upside down and spread paper clips evenly on the recessed bottom of the tin. Place the cardboard circle over the bottom (the cardboard should not touch the paper clips).  Secure this circle with thick tape, allowing the tape to overlap the sides. Kids can use drumsticks to tap this snare drum. Encourage them to think of other materials to use inside this drum besides paper clips to see what other sounds may be produced.

My craft originally published on education.com





**Source: Shake, Tap & Play a Merry Tune by Tania Cowling
Fearon Teaching Aids, 1992 (out of print- sold by author on amazon.com).

Photos by Tania Cowling, all rights reserved
Contact me for republication of any part of this blog post with a link back to Creative Preschool Time