Saturday, January 28, 2017

The Chinese New Year: Year of the Rooster



The Chinese New Year 2017 is the Year of the Rooster according to the Chinese Zodiac. It started Friday, January 27, 2017, and ends February 2nd. This is a fun holiday to celebrate with your children even if you are not of the Chinese descent.

Here are a couple articles to explain the holiday and activities you can partake with your children.

Chinese New Year Traditions (Holidays Helper)

The Chinese New Year is the most important and festive holiday by the Chinese people. It is celebrated on the first day of the lunar calendar (with the beginning of the New Moon) anywhere from January 21 to February 19. Each Chinese year is represented by a repeated cycle of 12 animals: rat, ox, tiger, rabbit, dragon, snake, horse, goat, monkey, rooster, dog and pig. In 2015, the Chinese New Year begins on February 19, 2015 and is the Year of the Goat/Sheep.
As part of the Chinese New Year celebration, presents are bought, decorations adorn the homes, special foods are made, and new clothing is worn. Days before the holiday, Chinese families are busy preparing their homes with a thorough cleaning. The cleaning rids the bad luck and allows good luck to enter. Brooms are put away on New Year’s Eve, so good luck can’t be swept away. Since the color red is a symbol of happiness to the Chinese, you will see many homes with red paint trims.

Teaching Your Kindergarten Class About the Chinese New Year (Bright Hub Education)
Chinese people consider The Chinese New Year as the most important and festive holiday. It is celebrated on the first day of the lunar calendar (with the beginning of the New Moon) anywhere from January 21 to February 19. These activities will help students understand the holiday.
  • Twelve animals of the Chinese zodiac represent each year and continue with a repeated cycle including the rat, ox, tiger, rabbit, dragon, snake, horse, goat, monkey, rooster, dog and pig. In 2017, the Chinese New Year begins on January 27, 2017 and ends on February 2. It is the Year of the Rooster.




Sunday, January 22, 2017

A New and Improved Illumibowl Makes Potty Visits Fun


Hi friends,

I'm back again raving about Illumibowl because they now have a new and improved version. I was given the privilege to review this awesome product in August 2016 and now I like this newer advancement even better. Making trips to the bathroom at night has been easier (no need to put on the bright lights and disturb your sleep) and this little device has engaged my grandkids in easier potty training.  They love to visit the colorful lights at grandma's house, which has led to their parents installing the Illumibowl Motion-Activated Toilet Night Light at their homes.

The new product is easier to install (no more suction cups or long wire for the bulb). The one-piece stay put arm is much better and this new product even has a dimmer to adjust the amount of light you prefer.

Click on this link to see a cute video. And below is my original post.

The Illumibowl Motion-Activated Toilet Night Light will delight your kids with lighted color in the toilet bowl. Do you like blue? Or green?  How about purple? See, when it’s dark at night the sensor will activate and light up the toilet bowl in your favorite color or you can let it morph in a spectrum of colors. It’s easy to install and you just have to provide three AAA batteries.


Kudos to these inventors! Just think how nice this will be to see the toilet at night without having to turn on bright lights. Lead your little ones to go to the color – it will be a novelty at first. Don’t be surprised if your youngster asks several times to go potty, but in the long run, this little device serves a purpose. And for older kids this nightlight helps them find the toilet on their own – easily and safely.

This is a product that was introduced on Shark Tank this past spring and after the demonstrations was picked up by Kevin O’Leary and now a Shark Tank product. You can find this toilet light at most Bed, Bath, and Beyond stores. Or you can order directly from their website. www.illumibowl.com

Since my blog site presents products for children, I thought this one-of-a-kind bathroom nightlight is perfect for families. But just think, it works great for adults too. No more bumps and bruises trying to find the porcelain throne in the dark. It stays on for two minutes, just enough time to do you business!

Make sure to visit this product’s website as there are numerous articles on bathroom tips and ones for potty training. Great tips for parents to read.



I want to thank Illumibowl for the opportunity to try their product. I was not paid or coached to write this blog post. The information about the product was provided and these are my own opinions.

Happy Parenting,
Tania :)

Monday, January 16, 2017

The Rhythm is Going to Get You!



Let’s face it, kids love to make noise and create things. Homemade rhythm instruments are all about cause and effect and kids can express feelings, moods, and emotions through music. These projects teach how sound is produced and ways that kids can change the properties of that sound. So, get out the box of recyclables and spend some quality time making music together.

WATER MUSIC:
5 clear glasses (all the same size)
Ruler
Water
Food Coloring
Numbered cards from 1-5
Metal spoon

Create a crystal concert using several glasses, water and food coloring. Fill the glasses with different levels of water to make different sounds. Follow the sequence of 1-inch in glass one, 2-inches in glass two and so on. The more water you put into the glass, the lower the tone. Tap out familiar songs with a spoon, or have your child compose his/her own tunes.
Play “Mary Had A Little Lamb” following this pattern:

3-2-1-2-3-3-3
2-2-2
3-5-5
3-2-1-2-3-3-3
3-2-2-3-2-1


PAPER PLATE TAMBOURINE:


Heavy-duty paper plate (paper, not plastic)
3-5 Jingle bells
Elastic thread or yarn
Paper hole punch
Markers, crayons, stickers
Glue

Decorate a paper plate with art materials. When finished, punch 3 to 5 holes around the rim with a hole punch. Tie one bell into each hole and add ribbons if you wish. Kids can hold the plate in their hands and shake it along with tapping the tambourine against their thighs and other parts of the body.

SNARE DRUM:  


Metal cookie/candy tin
Paper clips (about 20)
Cardboard circle (cut slightly larger than the diameter of the tin)
Packaging tape
Adhesive stickers, including musical notes
Drum sticks (unsharpened pencils or chopsticks)

Decorate the tin (lid discarded) and circle with colorful adhesive stickers (or paint a solid color with acrylic paints). Turn the tin upside down and spread paper clips evenly on the recessed bottom of the tin. Place the cardboard circle over the bottom (the cardboard should not touch the paper clips).  Secure this circle with thick tape, allowing the tape to overlap the sides. Kids can use drumsticks to tap this snare drum. Encourage them to think of other materials to use inside this drum besides paper clips to see what other sounds may be produced.

My craft originally published on education.com





**Source: Shake, Tap & Play a Merry Tune by Tania Cowling
Fearon Teaching Aids, 1992 (out of print- sold by author on amazon.com).

Photos by Tania Cowling, all rights reserved
Contact me for republication of any part of this blog post with a link back to Creative Preschool Time 

Tuesday, January 3, 2017

Cabin Fever Learning: Math With Cereal



Happy New Year! 

How many of you still have the kids home on Christmas break from school? Here is a fun way to brush up on those math skills using dry cereal at home.

One of the reasons that Americans have taken to breakfast cereals is that they are quick and easy. Besides, cereals have been specifically designed so kids will like them: creative shapes, colors, flavors and the box is entertaining while they eat.

Cereal can be used in mathematical learning, but think of the creative process this manipulative material offers to develop the senses and ingenious art activities as well. Try a few projects below and don’t forget to provide a clean bowl of cereal for munching!

Tactile Cards

On pieces of cardboard, draw a large number. Have the children glue O-shaped cereal inside, the same amount as the number value. After it’s dry, they can run their fingers along the shape of this number and begin counting skills, along with your help. Start with numbers one to five and increase numerals according to age and skill level.

Egg Carton Math Game

Write the numerals 1-12 inside the sections of an egg carton with a black marker. Give each child a cup of cereal and have him place pieces of cereal to correspond with the number in each section. Count the pieces together in each egg cup. As children play this game, they are learning to recognize symbols for each number. Another way to teach number recognition is to look for number symbols every time you sit together to read a book or look at magazines. Point to numerals and say the number name out loud.

Making Patterns

Make a pattern model using bamboo skewers. Thread on mini-marshmallows and O-shaped cereal. Use colorful cereal and sort by color or number of O’s between each marshmallow. Encourage the children to copy your model, and then make up patterns of their own. NOTE: Adult supervision is advised when using pointed sticks with young children. A variation to this activity is to glue cereal pieces on paper, creating specific patterns.

Geometric Cereal Shapes


You will need construction paper, scissors, glue and cereal for this project. Instruct children to cut out squares, triangles, circles and rectangles from the paper. Younger children may need adult help. Glue pieces of cereal to fill each shape.

Children learn by doing, so as they play, mathematical skills can be mastered. Think creatively by using cereal and foods to make this experience fun.

This article was originally published by this author on a closed Yahoo property and regional print magazines.
Photos by Tania K Cowling, all rights reserved